Programs / Franklin Drinking Water Issue

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SUCCESS on the City of Franklin's drinking water permitting issue!!

2/1/2007

 

AFTER TDEC PERMIT issued: The limits on withdrawing water maintains water flow over the lowhead dam all of the time which prevents as much algae build up behind the structure before it was removed in 2012.  The state's permit, issued in the fall of 2007 specified that no water could be pulled when the river was below 10 cfs at the intake location and that only 20% could be withdrawn when the river flow was above that cut-off.  See details below.  

 

 

 

 

BEFORE TDEC PERMIT ISSUED:  During the low-flow summer season, the city's water withdrawals would stop river flow over the lowhead dam.  This caused green algal build up in the pool and stagnating water which dramatically reduces water quality.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE who worked with us in so many ways on the Franklin drinking water withdrawal permitting issue.

TDEC’s permit sets the base flow at twice the city’s proposal (to 10 cfs). The city’s consultants reported last summer that at this base flow, there was not enough water in the river to operate a LARGER drinking water plant economically—it would be idle too much in the summer. A new plant the same size as the current one will also not operate year round during dry years.

TDEC not only set a higher base flow to stay in the river, TDEC is requiring the city to study the feasibility of removing the low head dam. This is the result of our efforts that engaged other agencies who are interested in funding the removal of these low head dams to improve fish habitat and recreation.

TDEC also is requiring the city to establish how they will measure the river’s flow at their withdrawal and install automatic shut-off systems. These and other mechanical issues were all raised by HRWA and experts since the city wanted to use the gages BELOW their withdrawal site as the way to run their operations. Our work this summer showed that the data from the USGS gage BELOW the city’s operations were highly compromised (especially by the excessively leaky city reservoir). This dramatically affected the city consultant’s analyses and made the river look like there was MORE water in it than there really would be.

TDEC also analyzed the affect of withdrawing water on the ability of the river to handle the sewage effluent that the city and two other sewer plants put into the river only five miles down from the drinking water outtake. This is also a big victory for our efforts to connect all the various permitted activities on the river and the next effort with the permits on the sewer plants that are up for renewal.
 

   AFTER TDEC PERMIT issued: The limits on withdrawing water maintains water flow over the lowhead dam all of the time which prevents as much algae build up behind the structure before it was removed in 2012.  The state's permit, issued in the fall of 2007 specified that no water could be pulled when the river was below 10 cfs at the intake location and that only 20% could be withdrawn when the river flow was above that cut-off.  See details below.  

 

 

 

 

BEFORE TDEC PERMIT ISSUED:  During the low-flow summer season, the city's water withdrawals would stop river flow over the lowhead dam.  This caused green algal build up in the pool and stagnating water which dramatically reduces water quality.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE who worked with us in so many ways on the Franklin drinking water withdrawal permitting issue.

 

Lowhead dam located at the drinking water plant intake slows Harpeth flow.

TDEC’s permit sets the base flow at twice the city’s proposal (to 10 cfs). The city’s consultants reported last summer that at this base flow, there was not enough water in the river to operate a LARGER drinking water plant economically—it would be idle too much in the summer. A new plant the same size as the current one will also not operate year round during dry years.

TDEC not only set a higher base flow to stay in the river, TDEC is requiring the city to study the feasibility of removing the low head dam. This is the result of our efforts that engaged other agencies who are interested in funding the removal of these low head dams to improve fish habitat and recreation.

TDEC also is requiring the city to establish how they will measure the river’s flow at their withdrawal and install automatic shut-off systems. These and other mechanical issues were all raised by HRWA and experts since the city wanted to use the gages BELOW their withdrawal site as the way to run their operations. Our work this summer showed that the data from the USGS gage BELOW the city’s operations were highly compromised (especially by the excessively leaky city reservoir). This dramatically affected the city consultant’s analyses and made the river look like there was MORE water in it than there really would be.

TDEC also analyzed the affect of withdrawing water on the ability of the river to handle the sewage effluent that the city and two other sewer plants put into the river only five miles down from the drinking water outtake. This is also a big victory for our efforts to connect all the various permitted activities on the river and the next effort with the permits on the sewer plants that are up for renewal.